<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Fri, Apr 18, 2008 at 10:35 AM, Arnau Bria &lt;<a href="mailto:arnaubria@pic.es">arnaubria@pic.es</a>&gt; wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
<div class="Ih2E3d">On Fri, 18 Apr 2008 10:21:28 -0400<br>
Glen Beane wrote:<br>
<br>
<br>
&gt; &gt; &gt; anything positive is set by the job, so if you use bash for your<br>
&gt; &gt; &gt; shell you would check bash return values (e.g. if your job is<br>
&gt; &gt; &gt; terminated with a fatal signal bash returns the signal number +<br>
&gt; &gt; &gt; 128)<br>
&gt; &gt;<br>
&gt; &gt; Ok, and when the exit is less than 128? Exit staus=1 ?<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; Like I said, &nbsp;these exit status values are set by your job. &nbsp;You need<br>
&gt; to look at your program documentation (and possibly bash<br>
&gt; documentation) to find out.<br>
</div>Ok, I undesrtood that if my program eits with 1, torque will show me<br>
129, not 1.</blockquote></div><br><br>no,&nbsp; that is not true.&nbsp; Under normal circumstances Torque will show you whatever bash (if that is your shell) returns.&nbsp; Bash itself returns the exit status of the last command that was executed. &nbsp; If a command exits from a fatal signal then bash uses the signal number plus 128 as the exit value.&nbsp;&nbsp; If a command is not found then bash uses 127. If the command ws found but is not executable then bash uses 126 for the exit status.&nbsp; If torque reports the exit status of your job as 1 then whatever the last command that is executed in your script is returning 1.<br>